Table of Student Descriptors

This table contains student descriptors for each cell of the Technology Integration Matrix (TIM).







Active Learning
Student Descriptors


Active Entry. Students receive information from the teacher or from other sources. Students may be watching an instructional video on a website or using a computer program for "drill and practice" activities.




Active Adoption. Students are using technology in conventional ways and the locus of control is on the teacher.

Active Adaptation. Students work independently with technology tools in conventional ways. Students are developing a conceptual understanding of technology tools and begin to engage with these tools.




Active Infusion. Students understand how to use many types of technology tools, are able to select tools for specific purposes, and use them regularly.

Active Transformation. Students have options on how and why to use different technology tools, and often extend the use of tools in unconventional ways. Students are focused on what they are able to do with the technology. The technology tools become an invisible part of the learning.






Collaborative Learning
Student Descriptors


Collaborative Entry. Students primarily work alone when using technology. Students may collaborate without using technology tools.




Collaborative Adoption. Students have opportunities to use collaborative tools, such as email, in conventional ways. These opportunities for collaboration with others through technology or in using technology are limited, and are not a regular part of their learning.

Collaborative Adaptation. Students independently use technology tools in conventional ways for collaboration. Students are developing a conceptual understanding of the use of technology tools for working with others.




Collaborative Infusion. Technology use for collaboration by students is regular and normal in this setting. Students choose the best tools to use to accomplish their work.

Collaborative Transformation. Students regularly use technology tools for collaboration, to work with peers and experts irrespective of time zone or physical distances.






Constructive Learning
Student Descriptors


Constructive Entry. Students receive information from the teacher via technology.




Constructive Adoption. Students begin to utilize technology tools (such as graphic organizers) to build on prior knowledge and construct meaning.

Constructive Adaptation. Students begin to use technology tools independently to facilitate construction of meaning. With their growing conceptual understanding of the technology tools, students can explore the use of these tools as they are building knowledge.




Constructive Infusion. Students consistently have opportunities to select technology tools and use them in the way that best facilitates their construction of understanding.

Constructive Transformation. Students use technology to construct and share knowledge in ways that may have been impossible without technology. They have a deep understanding of the technology tools that allows them to explore and extend the use of the tools to construct meaning.






Authentic Learning
Student Descriptors


Authentic Entry. Students use technology to complete assigned activities that are generally unrelated to the world beyond the instructional setting.




Authentic Adoption. Students have opportunities to apply technology tools to some content-specific activities that are related to the students or issues beyond the instructional setting.

Authentic Adaptation. Students begin to use technology tools on their own in activities that have meaning beyond the instructional setting.




Authentic Infusion. Students select appropriate technology tools to complete activities that have a meaningful context beyond the instructional setting. Students regularly use technology tools, and are comfortable in choosing and using the tools in the most meaningful way for each activity.

Authentic Transformation. Students explore and extend the use of technology tools to participate in projects and higher order learning activities that have meaning outside of school. Students regularly engage in these types of activities that may have been impossible to achieve without technology.






Goal-Directed Learning
Student Descriptors


Goal-Directed Entry. Students receive directions, guidance, and feedback via technology. For example, students may work through levels of an application that provides progressively more difficult practice activities.




Goal-Directed Adoption. Students follow procedural instructions to use technology to either plan, monitor, or evaluate an activity. For example, students may begin a K-W-L chart using concept mapping application.

Goal-Directed Adaptation. Students have opportunities to independently use technology tools to facilitate goal-setting, planning, monitoring, and evaluating specific activities. Students explore the use of the technology tools for these purposes.




Goal-Directed Infusion. Students regularly use technology tools to set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, and evaluate results. The students know how to use, and have access to, a variety of technologies from which they choose. For example, students may choose to write a blog for peer mentoring toward self- selected writing goals.

Goal-Directed Transformation. Students engage in ongoing metacognitive activities at a level that may have been unattainable without the support of technology tools. Students are empowered to extend the use of technology tools and have greater ownership and responsibility for learning.

View table as a PDF. (Recommended for printing.)

ActiveIconTiny-1Active Learning Student Descriptors


Active Entry. Students receive information from the teacher or from other sources. Students may be watching an instructional video on a website or using a computer program for “drill and practice” activities.

Active Adoption. Students are using technology in conventional ways and the locus of control is on the teacher.

Active Adaptation. Students work independently with technology tools in conventional ways. Students are developing a conceptual understanding of technology tools and begin to engage with these tools.

Active Infusion. Students understand how to use many types of technology tools, are able to select tools for specific purposes, and use them regularly.

Active Transformation. Students have options on how and why to use different technology tools, and often extend the use of tools in unconventional ways. Students are focused on what they are able to do with the technology. The technology tools become an invisible part of the learning.

collaborativetinyCollaborative Learning Student Descriptors


Collaborative Entry. Students primarily work alone when using technology. Students may collaborate without using technology tools.

Collaborative Adoption. Students have opportunities to use collaborative tools, such as email, in conventional ways. These opportunities for collaboration with others through technology or in using technology are limited, and are not a regular part of their learning.

Collaborative Adaptation. Students independently use technology tools in conventional ways for collaboration. Students are developing a conceptual understanding of the use of technology tools for working with others.

Collaborative Infusion. Technology use for collaboration by students is regular and normal in this setting. Students choose the best tools to use to accomplish their work.

Collaborative Transformation. Students regularly use technology tools for collaboration, to work with peers and experts irrespective of time zone or physical distances.

ConstructiveIconTiny-1Constructive Learning Student Descriptors


Constructive Entry. Students receive information from the teacher via technology.

Constructive Adoption. Students begin to utilize technology tools (such as graphic organizers) to build on prior knowledge and construct meaning.

Constructive Adaptation. Students begin to use technology tools independently to facilitate construction of meaning. With their growing conceptual understanding of the technology tools, students can explore the use of these tools as they are building knowledge.

Constructive Infusion. Students consistently have opportunities to select technology tools and use them in the way that best facilitates their construction of understanding.

Constructive Transformation. Students use technology to construct and share knowledge in ways that may have been impossible without technology. They have a deep understanding of the technology tools that allows them to explore and extend the use of the tools to construct meaning.

AuthentictinyAuthentic Learning Student Descriptors


Authentic Entry. Students use technology to complete assigned activities that are generally unrelated to the world beyond the instructional setting.

Authentic Adoption. Students have opportunities to apply technology tools to some content-specific activities that are related to the students or issues beyond the instructional setting.

Authentic Adaptation. Students begin to use technology tools on their own in activities that have meaning beyond the instructional setting.

Authentic Infusion. Students select appropriate technology tools to complete activities that have a meaningful context beyond the instructional setting. Students regularly
use technology tools, and are comfortable in choosing and using the tools in the most meaningful way for each activity.

Authentic Transformation. Students explore and extend the use of technology tools to participate in projects and higher order learning activities that have meaning outside of school. Students regularly engage in these types of activities that may have been impossible to achieve without technology.

Goal-DirectedIconTiny-1Goal-Directed Learning Student Descriptors


Goal-Directed Entry. Students receive directions, guidance, and/or feedback via technology. For example, students may work through levels of an application that provides progressively more dif cult practice activities.

Goal-Directed Adoption. Students follow procedural instructions to use technology to either plan, monitor, or evaluate an activity. For example, students may begin a K-W-L chart using concept mapping application.

Goal-Directed Adaptation. Students have opportunities to independently use technology tools to facilitate goal-setting, planning, monitoring, and evaluating specific activities. Students explore the use of the technology tools for these purposes.

Goal-Directed Infusion. Students regularly use technology tools to set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, and evaluate results. The students know how to use, and have access to, a variety of technologies from which they choose. For example, students may choose to write a blog for peer mentoring toward self-selected writing goals.

Goal-Directed Transformation. Students engage in ongoing metacognitive activities at a level that may have been unattainable without the support of technology tools. Students are empowered to extend the use of technology tools and have greater ownership and responsibility for learning.

View table as a PDF. (Recommended for printing.)