Technology Integration Matrix 2005-2010

This table contains the first version of the Technology Integration Matrix (TIM). Developed by the Florida Center for Instructional Technology, this version was in use from 2005 until it was superseded by version 2 in 2011. Each of the 25 cells in version 1 was accompanied by a classroom video demonstrating 1:1 access and a second video demonstrating the concept with shared-access technology. This early version of the Technology Integration Matrix is presented here as an historical document for researchers interested in the development and evolution of the TIM.

* * * * * * Version 1 is outdated and should no longer be used for observation or training purposes. * * * * * *




Technology Integration Matrix
Version 1.0

In use 2005-2010

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SUPERSEDED
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Entry Level

The teacher uses technology to deliver curriculum content to students.




Adoption Level

The teacher directs students in the conventional use of tool-based software. If such software is available, this level is the recommended entry point.

Adaptation Level

The teacher encourages adaptation of tool-based software by allowing students to select a tool and modify its use to accomplish the task at hand.




Infusion Level

The teacher creates a learning environment that infuses the power of technology tools throughout the day and across subject areas.

Transformation Level

The teacher creates a rich learning environment in which students regularly engage in activities that would have been impossible to achieve without technology.




Active Learning

Students are actively engaged in using technology as a tool rather than passively receiving information from the technology.


Active Entry. Students use technology for drill and practice and computer based training.




Active Adoption. Students begin to utilize technology tools to create products, for example using a word processor to create a report.

Active Adaptation. Students have opportunities to select and modify technology tools to accomplish specific purposes, for example using colored cells on a spreadsheet to plan a garden.




Active Infusion. Throughout the school day, students are empowered to select appropriate technology tools and actively apply them to the tasks at hand.

Active Transformation. Given ongoing access to online resources, students actively select and pursue topics beyond the limitations of even the best school library.



Collaborative Learning

Students use technology tools to collaborate with others rather than working individually at all times.


Collaborative Entry. Students primarily work alone when using technology.




Collaborative Adoption. Students have opportunities to utilize collaborative tools, such as email, in conventional ways.

Collaborative Adaptation. Students have opportunities to select and modify technology tools to facilitate collaborative work.




Collaborative Infusion. Throughout the day and across subject areas, students utilize technology tools to facilitate collaborative learning.

Collaborative Transformation. Technology enables students to collaborate with peers and experts irrespective of time zone or physical distances.



Constructive Learning

Students use technology tools to build understanding rather than simply receive information.


Constructive Entry. Technology is used to deliver information to students.




Constructive Adoption. Students begin to utilize constructive tools such as graphic organizers to build upon prior knowledge and construct meaning.

Constructive Adaptation. Students have opportunities to select and modify technology tools to assist them in the construction of understanding.




Constructive Infusion. Students utilize technology to make connections and construct understanding across disciplines and throughout the day.

Constructive Transformation. Students use technology to construct, share, and publish knowledge to a worldwide audience.



Authentic Learning

Students use technology tools to solve real-world problems meaningul to them rather than working on artificial assignments.


Authentic Entry. Students use technology to complete assigned activities that are generally unrelated to real-world problems.




Authentic Adoption. Students have opportunities to apply technology tools to some content-specific activities that are based on real-world problems.

Authentic Adaptation. Students have opportunities to select and modify technology tools to solve problems based on real-world issues.




Authentic Infusion. Students select appropriate technology tools to complete authentic tasks across disciplines.

Authentic Transformation. By means of technology tools, students participate in outside-of-school projects and problem-solving activities that have meaning for the students and the community.



Goal-Directed Learning

Students use technology tools to set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, and evaluate results rather than simply completing assignments without reflection.


Goal-Directed Entry. Students receive directions, guidance, and feedback from technology, rather than using technology tools to set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, or self-evaluate.




Goal-Directed Adoption. From time to time, students have the opportunity to use technology to either plan, monitor, or evaluate an activity.

Goal-Directed Adaptation. Students have opportunities to select and modify the use of technology tools to facilitate goal-setting, planning, monitoring, and evaluating specific activities.




Goal-Directed Infusion. Students use technology tools to set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, and evaluate results throughout the curriculum.

Goal-Directed Transformation. Students engage in ongoing metacognative activities at a level that would be unattainable without the support of technology tools.

View table as a PDF. (Recommended for printing.)

Technology Integration Matrix 2005-2010

This table contains the first version of the Technology Integration Matrix (TIM). Developed by the Florida Center for Instructional Technology, this version was in use from 2005 until it was superseded by version 2 in 2011. Each of the 25 cells in version 1 was accompanied by a classroom video demonstrating 1:1 access and a second video demonstrating the concept with shared-access technology. This early version of the Technology Integration Matrix is presented here as an historical document for researchers interested in the development and evolution of the TIM. Version 1 is outdated and should no longer be used for observation or training purposes.

Entry Level

The teacher uses technology to deliver curriculum content to students.


Adoption Level

The teacher directs students in the conventional use of tool-based software. If such software is available, this level is the recommended entry point.


Adaptation Level

The teacher encourages adaptation of tool-based software by allowing students to select a tool and modify its use to accomplish the task at hand.


Infusion Level

The teacher creates a learning environment that infuses the power of technology tools throughout the day and across subject areas.


Transformation Level

The teacher creates a rich learning environment in which students regularly engage in activities that would have been impossible to achieve without technology.

Active Learning

Students are actively engaged in using technology as a tool rather than passively receiving information from the technology.

Active Entry. Students use technology for drill and practice and computer based training.

Active Adoption.  Students begin to utilize technology tools to create products, for example using a word processor to create a report.

Active Adaptation.  Students have opportunities to select and modify technology tools to accomplish specific purposes, for example using colored cells on a spreadsheet to plan a garden.

Active Infusion.  Throughout the school day, students are empowered to select appropriate technology tools and actively apply them to the tasks at hand.

Active Transformation.  Given ongoing access to online resources, students actively select and pursue topics beyond the limitations of even the best school library.

Collaborative Learning

Students use technology tools to collaborate with others rather than working individually at all times.

Collaborative Entry.  Students primarily work alone when using technology.

Collaborative Adoption. Students have opportunities to utilize collaborative tools, such as email, in conventional ways.

Collaborative Adaptation. Students have opportunities to select and modify technology tools to facilitate collaborative work.

Collaborative Infusion. Throughout the day and across subject areas, students utilize technology tools to facilitate collaborative learning.

Collaborative Transformation.  Technology enables students to collaborate with peers and experts irrespective of time zone or physical distances.

Constructive Learning

Students use technology tools to build understanding rather than simply receive information.

Constructive Entry.  Technology is used to deliver information to students.

Constructive Adoption.  Students begin to utilize constructive tools such as graphic organizers to build upon prior knowledge and construct meaning.

Constructive Adaptation.  Students have opportunities to select and modify technology tools to assist them in the construction of understanding.

Constructive Infusion.  Students utilize technology to make connections and construct understanding across disciplines and throughout the day.

Constructive Transformation.  Students use technology to construct, share, and publish knowledge to a worldwide audience.

Authentic Learning

Students use technology tools to solve real-world problems meaningul to them rather than working on artificial assignments.

Authentic Entry.  Students use technology to complete assigned activities that are generally unrelated to real-world problems.

Authentic Adoption. Students have opportunities to apply technology tools to some content-specific activities that are based on real-world problems.

Authentic Adaptation. Students have opportunities to select and modify technology tools to solve problems based on real-world issues.

Authentic Infusion. Students select appropriate technology tools to complete authentic tasks across disciplines.

Authentic Transformation.  By means of technology tools, students participate in outside-of-school projects and problem-solving activities that have meaning for the students and the community.

Goal-Directed Learning

Students use technology tools to set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, and evaluate results rather than simply completing assignments without reflection.

Goal-Directed Entry.  Students receive directions, guidance, and feedback from technology, rather than using technology tools to set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, or self-evaluate.

Goal-Directed Adoption.  From time to time, students have the opportunity to use technology to either plan, monitor, or evaluate an activity.

Goal-Directed Adaptation. Students have opportunities to select and modify the use of technology tools to facilitate goal-setting, planning, monitoring, and evaluating specific activities.

Goal-Directed Infusion.  Students use technology tools to set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, and evaluate results throughout the curriculum.

Goal-Directed Transformation.  Students engage in ongoing metacognative activities at a level that would be unattainable without the support of technology tools.

View table as a PDF. (Recommended for printing.)